Singing is a hobby that many people enjoy. On top of being a fun hobby, it also brings many benefits in life. Not only are there mental benefits of singing, but singing can also help you improve your physical health.

When you are just starting out to learn how to sing, you may be overwhelmed by the many different approaches to learning out there. You may find courses that promise to make you a better singer in one day, or within a short period of time. There are also websites such as Superprof where you can find a dedicated singing tutor to meet your needs.

When you are learning to sing or practicing the art to improve your physical health, it is important to treat singing like learning a new language. Singing can be a holistic experience, and if you are interested in improving your skills, try to learn as much information as possible. Start by working on individual topics and rotating them over time so that these concepts can stick with you in the long run.

Spending a couple of minutes on breathing exercises every day as well as other singing techniques will make you feel accomplished and relaxed. Continue reading to learn more ways you can use singing to improve your physical health.

The best Singing tutors available
1st lesson free!
Charlie
5
5 (9 reviews)
Charlie
$80
/h
1st lesson free!
Laith
5
5 (3 reviews)
Laith
$25
/h
1st lesson free!
Alexander
Alexander
$20
/h
1st lesson free!
Ashton
Ashton
$40
/h
1st lesson free!
Joao
5
5 (2 reviews)
Joao
$30
/h
1st lesson free!
Rebecca
5
5 (7 reviews)
Rebecca
$50
/h
1st lesson free!
Elenamaria
5
5 (10 reviews)
Elenamaria
$25
/h
1st lesson free!
Tara
Tara
$70
/h
1st lesson free!
Charlie
5
5 (9 reviews)
Charlie
$80
/h
1st lesson free!
Laith
5
5 (3 reviews)
Laith
$25
/h
1st lesson free!
Alexander
Alexander
$20
/h
1st lesson free!
Ashton
Ashton
$40
/h
1st lesson free!
Joao
5
5 (2 reviews)
Joao
$30
/h
1st lesson free!
Rebecca
5
5 (7 reviews)
Rebecca
$50
/h
1st lesson free!
Elenamaria
5
5 (10 reviews)
Elenamaria
$25
/h
1st lesson free!
Tara
Tara
$70
/h
First Lesson Free>

Are You Ready to Learn Singing?

If you have never tried singing lessons or singing seriously before, you might feel inadequate to start. If you are not sure, ask yourself some basic questions.

The first question is - are you able to control your voice? Think about how you sound in your head when you are singing and how you sound when you listen to your own voice recordings. Do you know how to manipulate your voice to make yourself stay on the key as well as changing your pitch? Some people can do this more naturally than others, and learning how to do this has a physical benefit as it improves your singing muscles.

Boy wearing a white bear hat with his mouth open to sing.
Think about how you sound in your head when you are singing. (Photo by Maria Lara on Unsplash)

Another question to think about as an aspiring singer is if your voice has a good tone. The tone of your voice refers to the overall timbre of your voice and is usually gauged by how a person sings their vowels. Knowing the physical characteristics of your voice, such as is it hoarse or smooth, hard or soft, light or heavy, broad or narrow, for example, will help you understand your singing skills better.

One more question to think about is if you are able to pronounce your words clearly. Some people have trouble talking clearly to make themselves understandable to others whether it be due to the physical limitations of their features, or if they just like to slur their words naturally. To sing well, it's important to know that you need to have clear pronunciations and when singing, this takes a lot more effort than when talking.

How Singing Improves Your Physical Health

In recent years, scientists have released studies revealing that singing can provide numerous physical health benefits. For one, there is evidence that singing strengthens a person's immune system. And this is based on research conducted by scientists at the University of Frankfurt in Germany.

To complete this study, the scientists drew and tested blood from people who sang in a local professional choir in Frankfurt. These blood samples were taken before and after a 60-minute rehearsal session of Mozart’s Requiem. The results of the study reveal that there are higher concentrations of immunoglobin A in the singers' blood samples. This immunoglobin A is a protein in a person's immune system that function as antibodies. On top of this finding, levels of hydrocortisone - an anti-stress hormone, also increased significantly after a singing session.

Following this test, the scientists came back a week later and asked the members of the professional choir to listen to a recording of the Requiem song but without doing any actual singing. When the members of the choir's blood samples were tested after this session, scientists found that the composition of these blood samples did not change significantly. This leads the scientists to make the conclusion that singing could not only strengthen the immune system but also improve someone's mood.

Closeup of man with glasses opening his mouth wide to sing in front of microphone.
Singing can strengthen the immune system. (Photo by Vidar Nordli-Mathisen on Unsplash)
The best Singing tutors available
1st lesson free!
Charlie
5
5 (9 reviews)
Charlie
$80
/h
1st lesson free!
Laith
5
5 (3 reviews)
Laith
$25
/h
1st lesson free!
Alexander
Alexander
$20
/h
1st lesson free!
Ashton
Ashton
$40
/h
1st lesson free!
Joao
5
5 (2 reviews)
Joao
$30
/h
1st lesson free!
Rebecca
5
5 (7 reviews)
Rebecca
$50
/h
1st lesson free!
Elenamaria
5
5 (10 reviews)
Elenamaria
$25
/h
1st lesson free!
Tara
Tara
$70
/h
1st lesson free!
Charlie
5
5 (9 reviews)
Charlie
$80
/h
1st lesson free!
Laith
5
5 (3 reviews)
Laith
$25
/h
1st lesson free!
Alexander
Alexander
$20
/h
1st lesson free!
Ashton
Ashton
$40
/h
1st lesson free!
Joao
5
5 (2 reviews)
Joao
$30
/h
1st lesson free!
Rebecca
5
5 (7 reviews)
Rebecca
$50
/h
1st lesson free!
Elenamaria
5
5 (10 reviews)
Elenamaria
$25
/h
1st lesson free!
Tara
Tara
$70
/h
First Lesson Free>

Additional Research on Singing and Physical Health

At the University of Manchester, scientists have made the discovery that the sacculus, which is a tiny organ in the inner ear, responds to frequencies commonly found in music. This sacculus also happens to be connected to a part of the brain that registers the feeling of pleasure within seconds of detecting singing frequencies. As a result, singers will get immediate pleasure when they sing regardless of what it sounds like to anyone else.

This organ is likely what makes the singing experience enjoyable for many people as they get a release of endorphins that make them feel great. It's no wonder singing is a catharsis activity for some people and provides feelings of happiness. Think of singing as a mood lifter and anti-depressant that costs nothing and has no side effects.

Additional studies published in the Etude music magazine during its 1883 to 1957 publication run revealed both physical and psychological benefits of singing. In particular, singing has been recommended for good persons and for ill persons. Coming from philosophical to theoretical to pedagogical perspectives, there are conclusions that vocal music education in the form of music therapy should not be underestimated.

Leaflets published by the Health Education Authority reveal that the arts can contribute to our health, well-being, and life skills. Music as a therapeutic medium has been shown to be an effective form of pain management and in facilitating how a person deals with feelings of grief, which can oftentimes be quite physical. So the next time you are looking for physical pain relief, don't overlook singing as a form of therapy!

Did You Know That Singing Can be a Workout?

When you think of working out, you would picture someone hitting the gym to shed some sweat. But did you know that you can also work out in the music studio with your singing practice? It's true! Singing can be quite a physical workout as well!

This is because for those who are elderly, disabled, or injured, hitting the gym is not always possible and instead, they can use singing as a form of exercise. Even for people who are in good health, their lungs will get a workout when they employ proper singing techniques and vocal projections.

A woman standing in front of a band singing into microphone.
Workout in the music studio with your singing practice! (Photo by Gaurang Alat on Unsplash)

Over time, singers will develop stronger diaphragm muscles and during each practice session, will have stimulated overall circulation. Since singing requires a greater amount of oxygen in the lungs than many other types of exercises, it can even be said that singing can increase a person's aerobic capacity and stamina!

Not only do your diaphragm muscles get a workout when you sing, but your posture also gets a workout. Standing up straight and proper is part of having a correct singing technique. With time, good posture will become a habit for many singers. Similar to how a workout can improve your posture, the singing posture also helps relieve neck strain especially for those who sit at an office desk all day. We all know the tension that builds up in our upper back and chest areas as well as the feelings of stiffness around the neck and shoulders. When you sing, these feelings of tension can go away the more you practice proper singing postures.

Even More, Reasons to Sing!

Now that you are aware of all these physical benefits singing can provide for you, it's time to check out the other benefits of singing. If you are still not sure whether to pick up singing as a hobby, know that there are also numerous mental benefits of singing on top of other general benefits which we describe in other articles.

If you are stressed about life or find yourself overwhelmed with school or work, consider picking up singing as a hobby today! If you are a beginner singer, don't worry as there are many tutors who cater to beginners. You will find your way around the world of singing in no time with a little bit of help and a lot of hard work and determination. You might even become a star and find your secret talent in singing.

Whether you are singing to help you cope with the stress of living through a pandemic, or if you'd like to sing in a group to make friends, it's a sure fact that singing regularly will benefit your health over the long run.

Need a Singing tutor?

Enjoyed this article?

5.00/5 - 1 vote(s)
Loading...

Linda

Former high-school tutor with a passion for science and technology, I now work in the software industry and enjoy reading and learning about all kinds of topics.